September 17, 2012

Posted by orrinj at 8:13 PM

OR IT COULD JUST BE LACK OF TASTE:

Like V-necks? You might be gay  (The New Paper, Sep 16, 2012)

To the fury and disbelief of rights activists, the Malaysian government has endorsed a list of identifiable gay and lesbian traits for schools and parents to prevent the spread of what it perceives as a phenomenon among teenagers, especially students, media reports said. [...]

Its list for men includes preferences for V-necks and sleeveless clothes.

Posted by orrinj at 2:58 PM

DON'T HURT 'EM:


Posted by orrinj at 4:59 AM

TO FILM LIBERAL PIETIES WOULD MAKE IT TOO CLEAR HOW MORALLY REPULSIVE THEY ARE:

THE PROBLEM WITH THE LIBERAL CINEMA (Richard Brody, 9/08/12, The New Yorker)

The facts do not speak for themselves, and there's a remarkable and disheartening correlation between those who film as if they do and those who, imbuing these facts with a built-in point of view, are unwilling to stand in front of those facts and state that point of view. The underlying question is why movies made by many filmmakers whose point of view is, by and large, so sympathetic, tolerant, and liberal (and whose point of view I tend to share, by the way) are built on such a painful narrowing of experience and a surreptitious attitudinizing--why they're films of personal commitment that remain, nonetheless, impersonal. It's as if filmmakers (and, for that matter, critics, playing a surreptitious role as op-ed columnists) were protecting viewers from the potential effect of nasty or regressive or hateful thoughts; their own cultivated selves are are immune from them even if angered by them, but the poor bewildered viewer needs some protection from loose ends of imagination that could potentially lead in the wrong direction.

The Stakhanovite values of socialist realism have given way to the mild and sentimental ones of liberal realism; but the brazen hysteria of overt propaganda is a truer framework for political art--for the representation of will, faith, and power that political action depends on--than the tacitly closed circle of self-approving sympathies. The problem is not with liberalism in cinema as such (Wes Anderson's post-scriptural "Moonrise Kingdom" is, after all, a masterwork, and Nanni Moretti's ferociously anticlerical "We Have a Pope" borrows its furious ending from "The Great Dictator") but with the liberal cinema as a genre. The arena of practical politics is the place for constructive and responsible approaches to identified problems; the realm of art is the place of dangerous imagination and the vision of terrifying, or even merely uncomfortable, possibilities. And nothing undermines the actual quest for political progress like the sense that it would imply the denial or the repudiation of primal, atavistic, or impulsively unwelcome feelings.



Posted by orrinj at 4:41 AM

TREAT THEM WITH THE WOMEN:

20% of Anorexics Are Men : Twenty percent. And rising. More and more men are starving themselves to death in a pathological pursuit of perfection. Male anorexics have much in common with women who suffer from the same debilitating illness, but there's a striking difference: For the vast majority of men, help is not on the way (NATHANIEL PENN, September 2012, GQ)

As recently as a decade ago, clinicians believed that only 5 percent of anorexics were male. Current estimates suggest it's closer to 20 percent and rising fast: More men are getting ill, and more are being diagnosed. (One well-regarded Canadian study puts the number at 30 percent.) It's unclear why, but certainly twenty years of lean, muscular male physiques in advertising, movies, sports, and of course, magazines like GQ--from Marky Mark to Brad Pitt to David Beckham--have changed the way both men and women regard the male body. And thanks to the web, those images are easy to seek out and collect. For American men, the chiseled six-pack has become the fetishized equivalent of bigger breasts. Like all fetish objects, it stands for something deeply desired: social acceptance, the love of a parent or partner, happiness.

But many afflicted men feel too stigmatized to go to a doctor--and many doctors don't recognize the early, ambiguous symptoms. "It is not what a primary-care physician will consider at first glance," says Mark Warren, founder of the Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders. "Often it won't be what they consider at fourth or fifth glance."

Diagnosis is hard. Finding treatment is even harder. Many residential centers don't admit men, out of a belief that treatment should be sex-specific.