August 9, 2012

Posted by orrinj at 5:36 AM

VEGANISM IS A STRANGNESS, NOT A SPECIES:

Fossil discovery rewrites the story of human evolution (STEVE CONNOR, 09 AUGUST 2012, The Independent)

The history of human evolution is more complex than previously supposed, according to fossils showing that several species of early man once lived cheek by jowl in the same region of East Africa. [...]

The latest finds, published in the journal Nature, confirm that 1470 is a different species. The new fossilised face is almost identical to 1470, although smaller, and crucially has a set of back teeth that show it was a distinct species with a specialised, plant-eating diet, said Fred Spoor of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.




Posted by orrinj at 5:33 AM

WHY COMPLICATE IT?:

Stirring up sweet memories (Bill Daley, 8/08/12, Chicago Tribune)

Vanilla pudding can bring out the kid in you, especially as it conjures up memories of those huge institutional cans cranked open in summer camp dining halls or the tiny cups your mom would tuck into your school lunchbox.

Part of the appeal of vanilla pudding lies in its simplicity. It personifies the nostalgic flavors of childhood. Yet, vanilla pudding can be a key ingredient in more complicated desserts designed to please adults, treats like tarts and trifles and homemade ice pops.

Posted by orrinj at 5:25 AM

ONE WAY TO IMPROVE PORK? ADD BACON:

Bacon-Wrapped Pork Loin (The Denver Post, 8/08/12)

Wrap bacon strips around the pork loin, making sure the meat is completely covered. Tie every 1 inch with butcher's twine and grill over charcoal or wood grill until internal temp reaches 130 degrees. 

Posted by orrinj at 5:21 AM

ENGLISH, IT'S HOW THE METRIC SYSTEM WAS SUPPOSED TO WORK:

A survival skill in shrinking Japan: Learn English (Chico Harlan, 8/06/12, Washington Post)

Japanese billionaire Hiroshi Mikitani decided two years ago that the employees at his company, Rakuten Inc., should work almost entirely in English.

The idea, he said, was a daring and drastic attempt to counter Japan's shrinking place in the world. "Japanese people think it's so difficult to speak English," Mikitani said. "But we need to break the shell."

With the move, which took effect at the beginning of last month, Mikitani turned his e-commerce company -- an Amazon competitor -- into a test case for corporate Japan's survival strategy.

As Japan's population declines, all but guaranteeing ever-decreasing domestic business, companies here are grappling with how they should interact with the world and whether they can do it successfully.

The country has both a dread of English and an understandable attachment to its own ornate business customs. Those idiosyncrasies made Japan a bewildering but envied powerhouse during its economic boom. They now make Japan a poor match, experts say, for global business.